What is Biodynamic Gardening? Part 1

Biodynamics is “beyond organic” because of its complete, whole system approach. It offers a simple way to heal and nourish your growing environment.  It connects you to the cycles of the moon, seasons and natural rhythms of nature’s ways.  It is a sustainable way to grow nutrient dense foods because it puts more back into the soil more than it takes out.

Some of the practices are very different from conventional way, but when you begin to practice and apply the principles, the results are undeniable and they are already proven to produce high quality, nutritious food by working with nature, not against it.

The use of preparations, based on plants and minerals, brings vitality to soils and can take your growing experience to another level.

The preparations and the Stella Natura planting calendar really help to organize and simplify your gardening experience.

A major perk to growing biodynamically is that the costs of implimenting these practices are minimal. Biodynamic methods build soil value exponentially with less and less effort over time.

One thing that makes biodynamic gardening different is the preparations. There are nine of them that act as remedies to vitalize any soil.

The first step in having a yard farm is to set your intention.  Why do you want to be a yard farmer? Write it down.

Next it’s important to observe your plot area and assess if it is suitable for growing what you would like to grow, or learn what already grows well in your area in order to minimize your labor and make your project more likely to be successful.

Get a soil test.  We LOVE soil and helping people heal their soil so that they can grow and enjoy nutrient dense food!  The soil is indispensible to sustaining life on earth. We will talk more about soil in the next blog.

Stay tune for more first steps for growing biodynamically!

Be sure to download our podcasts https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-farm-a-yard-podcast/id1276181255?mt=2

Return to read more blogs to learn how to implement biodynamic methods in your yard.

 

019 – The Wealth in Weeds

019 – The Wealth in Weeds

with host Linda Borghi

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

It is not common for the words “weeds” and ‘wealth’ to be put into the same sentence.  Find out why Linda values weeds so highly!

After a 3 week trip wrap up of Linda’s travels, first  to her son’s wedding, then on to conduct 7 workshops at the Healing Farm, Linda shares why she felt so rich when she arrived home. One year earlier, there was only fire ant drilling holes everywhere in her yard.. Find out what has happened and what she is now doing with all her new “wealth”!  Links provided for all those who want to learn about biodynamics and how to get started using this method. Then go farm-a-yard…biodynamically!

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.  

For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

I Learned How to Prepare, But I Didn’t Consider Myself a “Prepper”.

We should be talking about this…What is your plan in a crisis situation?

Watching the hurricane disaster in Houston and now in my own “backyard”, really confirms how important it is to have a plan and to make “preparations”.

For me, I had the opportunity, when I was young, to learn from others about being “ready”, and now with the internet, it is easier than ever.  You can learn about almost any topic online and watch YouTube tutorials, etc.

When we were raising our children in snow country, it was considered a normal activity to put up the harvest for the winter and prepare for the probable loss of conveniences.

I learned how to prepare, but I didn’t consider myself a “Prepper”.

Being prepared should just be a normal life activity.

It all starts with a plan.

How true it is that not having a plan is a plan to fail.

Hurricane Matthew last year was a helpful reality check for me, I had never experience a hurricane.   It was a great teacher!  After you pass through a real emergency, you really know what you need to do better.

So I learned more through the experience and I am better prepared this time….I think.  🙂

There is always something that can be improved upon!

Preparation considerations overview:

Here is my short list:

  • Make a plan… ahead of time.  There are great planning templates on line to choose from to help you customize what will be best for your scenario. There are templates for families and/or businesses to get you started.

 

  • Figure out how you would live without a mobile phone or GPS maps (learn to use a map). What will be your plan for communication with your family? Set up an out-of-town contact point person so that members of your group can call if your local circuits are busy or unavailable.

 

  • Make a supplies checkoff list online AND print it out.

 

  • Practice the plan (live a weekend at home without the modern conveniences and also practice your evacuation plan) and know how to use the tools and equipment. (ie…how to start a fire, how to use a camp stove, how to install a wick for your oil lamp, how to set up a tent and rainfly…you get the picture.)

 

  • Water, Water, Water…How much will you need? Learn how to store it safely. Invest in a water filter that doesn’t require electricity. If you use large barrels, have a pump, or buckets to draw the water out.

 

  • Gather a few friends and neighbors and talk about preparing. Build alliances and collaborate.  We are better together.

 

Because of my work as a food educator, I was looking for high quality storage food that I could have on hand for myself AND also that I felt good about recommending.  It was really hard finding food that I would want to eat myself.  I am so accustom to growing some of my own food because the produce in the grocery store is so “old” already and contaminated with chemicals.  I was REALLY PICKY about making an investment in storage type foods!

After much disappointment, I am happy and grateful to report that I found a company that truly shares my values and has a proven track record of working hard to stay on top of this challenge to provide clean, healthy food that’s ready when you need it.

This is high quality food that you will have no problem eating even when there is NO disaster.

They also have the “Simple Plate” meals that are ready in 20 minutes for people who don’t have time to shop and chop.  They deliver right to your door and ready when you need it.

The food is not only healthy and non-GMO but also absolutely delicious! Frankly, I was shocked at how delicious it was.  The freeze dried process is way superior to dehydrated foods and the taste proves that!

I know I am not the only one who needs “convenience food” when I am busy or especially when I am traveling… I love taking this food along with me and not having to grab some toxic food-like substance because there is no other choice.   It is light as a feather and all I need is water, or I can just eat it right out of the package.

To learn more and get some to try for yourself, go to:

www.freezedriedtastings.thrivelife.com

Sign up and you are a member for life with no annual membership fees and there are easy options to waive your initial account set up! That’s what I did.  No minimum order required unless you want free shipping, and who doesn’t want free shipping?

Ask me how to get food for free by just inviting some friends and have your own tasting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

018 – Let’s Meet Farm-A-Yard Co-Founder Marsha

018 – Let’s Meet Farm-A-Yard Co-Founder Marsha

with host Linda Borghi and guest Farm-A-Yard Co-Founder Marsha Howe

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

Linda and Marsha are like 2 peas in a pod and share the firm conviction that everyone, everywhere, needs good healthy nutritious food, every day.  Marsha supports the grow-your-own local food movement in her area, teaches healthy cooking and eating classes, and since she lives in an apartment, Marsha has negotiated with others in her area to grow in public spaces.  Both grandmothers share the firm conviction that grass is a waste of gas, and that everyone has something better to do with their time than mow a lawn.  The Farm-A-Yard movement wouldn’t be the same without our balance of Linda’s East Coast Chutzpah and Marsha’s West Coast Mellow.  Welcome Marsha, co-Founder of Farm-A-Yard.

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.  For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

017 – Preparing for the Fall Season on a Biodynamic Farm

017 – Preparing for the Fall Season on a Biodynamic Farm

with host Linda Borghi and guest Stewart Lundy

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

What an exciting interview! Stewart and Linda discuss what preparing for fall looks like when using biodynamic methods. The shift in the fall, is about reaping the harvest but also about the importance of opening the earth to breathe. You can learn the techniques, but more importantly, learn why it is SO valuable to build the health of your soil.  Vital practices like these grow plant relationships for producing nutrient dense food.  You can do the same even with a 3×3 plot!  Experience what “life force” in food tastes like when you grow your own veggies! There will be no turning back!  You’re invited to the Perennial Roots Farm Workshop in Virginia, Friday October 20th!  Save the Date, details below.

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.  

For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

016 – Canning and Preserving: Capturing the August Sky

016 – Canning and Preserving: Capturing the August Sky

with Linda Borghi

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

“Fresh, summer tomatoes, fruit, green beans…I wanted to have that taste in February. I also wanted the taste of love in a jar”, says Linda who has been canning to capturing the August sky for many years.  Learn the details of Linda’s efficient one step process and how to have an outdoor canning station to capture your own unique taste of summer!

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.

For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

015 – Native Wisdom

015 – Episode- Native Wisdom

with host Linda Borghi and guest Courtni Hale

Courtni is a graduate of  American University, travelled in South America, studied under a Native American shaman and is apart of the seed sovereignty movement.  Linda and Courtni bring vast knowledge together into bite size pieces for the everyday practice and application in the typical yard farm.  We can all advance the solutions to the important food related issues facing our world today by learning from the dedicated folks interviewed in these podcasts  Learn more about incorporating native american tradition, keyhole gardening and Linda’s  famous cucumber roller coaster trellis into your yard farm!

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.   For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

Why I Rarely Go To The Grocery Store

Someone asked me recently why it was that I hardly needed to go to the grocery store.

After researching what is really going on with our food system, it’s imparative eating healthy is important to me. When I first moved into this food desert city in the south, I found that there is very little healthy food in the grocery stores. The stores are loaded with packaged, processed “food-like” snack substances with long ingredient lists (that are hard to pronounce!)  If the ingredient list is longer than a few ingredients, then it is too processed for me!

I live in the city in the upstairs of a back house under a gorgeous massive oak tree.  I am an urban farmer. I eat seasonal, local produce, cook from scratch and have little need to buy much at the grocery store.

I eat mostly a fresh diet of veggies, fruit, some grains, seeds, beans, eggs and  a little pasture raised meats. I also make my own probiotic foods like saurkraut & kefir, fresh nut milk, salad dressings, sauces and I have a great pantry to make shopping a breeze.  My personal pantry grocery store is just steps away!  I am a “semi-prepper” as I have always thought it was a good idea to store some extra food and supplies in case of an emergency of some sort.

Eating seasonally, has been sooo rewarding especially being in a different part of the country with new special foods to this area that were not frequently on my plate in my past location.and exciting especially when you get to eat some of what you grew yourself.  I am able to get a lot more fresh food diversity in my diet too.  So I capitalize on whatever is in season and put some of it up in the freezer for the winter too.

I harvest weekly from the public permaculture/perennial garden that I manage and other yard gardens that I work in.  I get unlimited herbs all year, which make a big difference for making the ordinary, extraordinary,as well as for medicine and teas.

[Dried Stevia Leaves]

Plus, I support local farmers and get seasonal veggies regularly from them to round out what I have growing and so that I can have access to a larger variety of produce without having to grow it all myself. I think it’s the best of both worlds!

I also am able to get pasture raised meats and eggs from local farmers.

Often I can find some organic options for dried beans, nuts and grains, pasta, coconut oil, olive oil, coconut milk/water and some dried or canned tomatoes/unsweetened fruits, sea salt, pepper, teas at discount stores like Big Lots.  When I do, I stock up.

Neighbors with fruit trees are often happy for others to harvest fruit so that it doesn’t go to waste.  A great opportunity to offer your help and take home some bounty to be canned, frozen or dried.

You can do this too!  Just start.  Take little steps. You’re body will thank you!

 

014 – For the Love of Gluten-Free Food

014 – For the Love of Gluten-Free Food

with host Linda Borghi and guest Carmela Decker

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

Carmela, a farmer’s market buddy of Linda’s, was born and raised in Italy before moving to the United States, and she caters and sells pre-made gluten-free meals, and discusses delicious and healthy food choices for people who have challenges with wheat products.  Make sure you check out her website and facebook feed for some terrific eyecandy treats.

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.  

For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.

013 – Creating Pollinator-Friendly Lawns

013 – Creating Pollinator-Friendly Lawns

with host Linda Borghi and guest Leslie Inman

Farm-A-Yard Podcast logo: orange sun with sunbeams rising over a mound of black dirt with 2 sprouts and a microphone in green coming up out of the soil.
Farm-A-Yard Podcast — It’s a movement… have ya heard?

Bees aren’t the only critters who need our help!  Join Linda & Leslie in a discussion of how native pollinating insects need native plants to thrive, how insects feed birds and bats, etc. and help form a foundational layer of our food web and ecosystem.  How do you start building a native pollinator refuge?  Let us help!

This podcast is made possible by funding by our Patreon supporters.  

For extra free content or to become a patron please see us at https://www.patreon.com/FarmAYard

Links:

Music credit: “Insomnia” by John Sheehan.  Used with permission.